default, superpanda, panda

Career change?

(Aren't I Miss Chatty today?)

So, I'm being booted out of my job, and I'm pondering... should I change careers? Should I think about a world outside of the tech world? What could you see me doing for a living?

(Serious and silly answers alike. Have fun.)
  • Current Mood: contemplative contemplative
... Wow. What a neat idea. I wonder how many zaftig dyed tattooed pierced Asian female bounty hunters there are out there. :)
Um.
Can this thought train stall at least until after you've talked to Tracy? (Or did she get over her cold enough to call you this afternoon?)
*laugh* Yes, ma'am. No, I didn't talk to Tracy today, but we did reschedule for Tuesday. I suspect that I won't be jumping rails just yet, as I'm not particularly trained for anything out of the tech sector just now, but the whole situation has really started me thinking about what I want to do, long-term. No worries, love. :)
I actually kind of did this once. Well, not exactly. I coordinated tours for Japanese tour groups.

Hrm. That could be fun, actually. :)
Oooh.

oooooooh.

You should be warned, I apparently look ridiculous when I'm vacuuming. :)

Do I get to wear neat house girl outfits?
Can you imagine what a silly silly store that would be? :)

"Why are the proprietors giggling?" "We don't know, but they do that a lot."
remind me to put you both on the stitch and bitch list (we're gonna go heavy on the bitch). yay, beadwork!
Off the top of my head...

  • Photographer

  • Writer

  • Tour guide (only for something you love)

  • Chef

  • Translator

  • Interior designer

  • Instructor (though this would probably still fall in the geek sector)

  • Panda

  • Goth queen

  • Snuggle bunny


Off the top of my head...
Photographer

While I take a lot of pictures, I don't know that I'm actually any good at it. :) This also applies to writer, and chef. (Erm. Things I do a lot, but don't know that I'm good enough to make a living at them.)

Tour guide

You know, this idea has more and more appeal to me the more I think of it. Can't you see me doing this in Hawaii? Or at the National Archives or Library of Congress or a zoo?

Interior designer

... You've never seen my place. I mean, even when clean, my apartment tends to be designed around, "Where can I put more books?"

Instructor

You know, from the time I was 5 to the time I was 20 or so, all I wanted to be was a teacher. I mean, I'd have brief flirtations with things like astronaut or cowboy or vet or author, but I always wanted to be a teacher. I started my own company in Hawaii largely as a training company, and still very much enjoy the time I get to spend teaching people things. But, I can't imagine doing it in any sort of public school these days. Mayve some sort of computer training center? They probably require one of those pesky degree things, though. (Though, Computer Training Center in Hawaii did not, when I worked there briefly years ago.)

Panda

It is notoriously hard to get a job as a panda. That, and I'd only get to have sex for like 3 days out of the year. I do have the wardrobe for it, though.

Goth queen

Speaking of having the wardrobe... This is, of course, tempered by the fact that I look ridiculous in goth gear. ;)

Snuggle bunny

Ah, finally something I excel out. Now, to find a way to make a living at it!
Off the top of my head...
While I take a lot of pictures, I don't know that I'm actually any good at it. :) This also applies to writer, and chef. (Erm. Things I do a lot, but don't know that I'm good enough to make a living at them.)

I'm not saying that you could become a pro right off the bat (I think for each of those things, a few classes might be in order), but you certainly have the potential. Same with interior design, I think. You have an artsy mind and can usually put things together that look/sound/taste good. With a bit of formal training, that could easily evolve into a career path.
Hm. I've often thought of being a bicycle messenger. Less stress than being an IT manager and the air is more fresh.

Another thought would be to simply punt and become an electrician. Check into a trade; plumbers and electricians do quite well actually. AC contractors too...

CZ
Getting sick and tired of the IT world as well. *hug*
>plumbers and electricians do quite well actually

Don't count on that. I know an electrician who was out of work for about 18 months and recently took a job in non-electrical construction.
Ouch. I've always been under the impression that since it is a trade with a rather high barrier of admission (apprenticeship, etc) that the supply would be a bit less of an issue than with say the IT world.

Also harder to install a breaker panel while in India...

CZ
Hm. I've often thought of being a bicycle messenger. Less stress than being an IT manager and the air is more fresh.

I used to be a very avid cyclist (those of you who know me only in more recent years, stop laughing; it's true!), and if I ever manage to get down to a more reasonable size, this actually has some allure to it. At least, the concept does. I can't imagine doing it in the climates I live in these days, though. :)

Another thought would be to simply punt and become an electrician. Check into a trade; plumbers and electricians do quite well actually. AC contractors too...

I'm not allowed to play with tools. It's sad, really. I used to really enjoy helping my dad with his electricians gigs in Hawaii.

Getting sick and tired of the IT world as well. *hug*

*hugs* It's weird, isn't it? I know a lot of people who are now re-evaluating their choice to be professional computer geeks. It seems a lot of us fell into it almost by accident, by virtue of knowing things that not many (relatively) other people knew, and it being lucrative. After a decade or more of it, though, a lot of people seem to be finding that the opportunities out there in the field aren't things that make us happy. I don't know what I want to do, but I'm pretty sure that pure bit-pushing isn't it, anymore.

An interesting place to be, it is.
Replying late.
*snip*
After a decade or more of it, though, a lot of people seem to be finding that the opportunities out there in the field aren't things that make us happy. I don't know what I want to do, but I'm pretty sure that pure bit-pushing isn't it, anymore.

I know 10 years experience has gotten me to a place where I spend most of my time laying groundwork for someone else to write code. It has its satisfactions I suppose, but the rush of getting to see the my handiwork helping others is pretty much gone and has been for years. My point? Our jobs are not the things that drew us to the profession anymore. At least mine's not. A'course the money's still good.

k.